“PROSECUTORIAL DISCRETION” Fictional Story

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Click image for book’s page on Starve Monkey Press.

This is a fictional story I started writing on another blog with the intention of having it just be a 3 or 4 blog-post story to highlight the downside of a prosecutor’s power to look the other way.  However, as I wrote it, the story took on a life of its own and grew into short novel length. Starve Monkey Press agreed to take it on, and it’s available in Kindle format.
The story is about a small group of folks who decide to take matters into their own hands to address a situation similar to the real-life incidents featured in this blog. Having very limited numbers and resources, they resort to a dirty, underhanded, and violent tactic in an attempt to rectify the situation.  The tactic they use is one which I do believe would be effective, but, as I said, very underhanded….almost like cheating.  And, to my knowledge, the tactic they use has not been used by anyone before, but my knowledge is limited to the public domain.
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Barbara LaWall: No Prosecution Despite $3.4 Million Settlement in Jose Guerena Killing

TUCSON (AP) – The family of a former Marine who was killed when a SWAT team raided his Tucson-area home in 2011 has settled a lawsuit with four police agencies for $3.4 million, a newspaper reported Thursday.
If they did nothing wrong, why settle? And since a civil lawsuits’ 51% “preponderance of evidence” is basically a mirror-image of the standard for indictment, why hasn’t Pima County Attorney Barbara LaWall done anything to prosecute the SWAT officers who broke into Guerena’s home without sufficient warning, shot him, and denied paramedics access until after he was dead? The article says:
“The county attorney’s office later cleared the SWAT team officers of any wrongdoing.”
Notice it doesn’t say “a grand jury cleared the SWAT team.” Because if it had been put in front of a grand jury, whose indictment standards are similar to the culpability standards applied in civil cases, then there’s a good chance that someone involved would have been indicted. This should be plain-as-day in light of the fact that Pima County decided to settle rather than let the lawsuit go to trial. So why hasn’t the Pima County Attorney moved to indict anyone for anything?